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Course Descriptions

Arabic Courses on AMIDEAST Programs

Arabic is a diglossic language.  That is, there are two varieties of Arabic, one for reading and writing and another for speaking. The textbook series used in Arabic courses in all AMIDEAST Education Abroad Programs in the Arab World, Al Kitaab fii Taallum al Arabiyya, Second Edition, introduces both varieties from the beginning to help students engage easily in their host country and learn the language as its native speakers learn it. However, in the AMIDEAST programs separate courses address two the different varieties of Arabic – Modern Standard Arabic and the local dialect. 

While the multi-media materials that accompany the Al Kitaab series are available only in the Egyptian and Syrian dialects, AMIDEAST, with partial support from the International Research and Studies Program of the U.S. Department of Education, has produced multi-media materials to accompany the series in Jordanian and Moroccan dialects.  In addition, also with partial support from the U.S. Department of Education, AMIDEAST has produced multi-media materials to supplement classroom instruction and assist students in the development of cultural competence in Egyptian, Jordanian and Moroccan dialect and culture.  All of those materials are used in the colloquial Arabic courses taught in the AMIDEAST Education Abroad Programs in those countries.

The program offers two 4-week sessions, allowing a student to move through two levels in one summer. The teachers are carefully selected native speakers with excellent language teaching experience and skills.

Classes meet 5 hours per day; 5 days per week. Each session therefore includes 100 hours of instruction in Modern Standard Arabic (5 credits) and Moroccan colloquial (1 credit). The curriculum is based on AMIDEAST’s Arabic Language and Culture Curriculum, which is functional and communicative in its approach.

All students enroll in Modern Standard Arabic and in Colloquial Moroccan Arabic (Darija) at a level appropriate to their proficiency. Modern Standard Arabic meets for 4 hours a day and Moroccan Arabic for 1 hour a day. Students are placed into appropriate Modern Standard Arabic and Colloquial Arabic levels based on an Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) and written Arabic exam conducted prior to their departure. The following levels are offered (see course descriptions from semester Arabic program above):

Modern Standard Arabic I (Arabic 101; 5 credits)*
Modern Standard Arabic II (Arabic 102; 5 credits)
Modern Standard Arabic III (Arabic 201; 5 credits)
Modern Standard Arabic IV (Arabic 202; 5 credits)
Modern Standard Arabic V (Arabic 301; 5 credits)
Modern Standard Arabic VI (Arabic 302; 5 credits)
Directed Studies in Arabic (Arabic 401; 5 credits)

Colloquial Moroccan Arabic I (Arabic 110, 1 credit)
Colloquial Moroccan Arabic II (Arabic 210, 1 credit)
Colloquial Moroccan Arabic III (Arabic 310, 1 credit)

For students whose proficiency is beyond the advanced level (ARAB 302), a tutorial program (ARAB 401) will be arranged to address their specific interests (Media Arabic; Arabic literature; Classical Arabic texts, etc.).


 *Note: Arabic 101 is only offered in summer sessions if there are a sufficient number of applicants who do not have any background in the Arabic language. We do not guarantee that this course will be available. Please indicate on your application if you are hoping to enroll in 101.

 For more information about Arabic courses and the placement test process, please view the Arabic with AMIDEAST Overview here.

Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) with AMIDEAST

 

 MSA Level

Textbook Coverage

Arabic 101

Alif Baa (2nd Edition); Al-Kitaab, Book One (2nd Edition) Chapters 1-5

Arabic 102

Al-Kitaab, Book One (2nd Edition) Chapters 6-13

Arabic 201

Al-Kitaab, Book One (2nd Edition) and local supplementary materials Chapters 14-20

Arabic 202

Al-Kitaab, Book Two (2nd Edition) and local supplementary materials Chapters 1-5

Arabic 301

Al-Kitaab, Book Two (2nd Edition) and local supplementary materials Chapters 6-10

Arabic 302

Al-Kitaab, Book Three (2nd Edition) and local supplementary materials Chapters 1-5

Arabic 401

Teaching Materials will consist of faculty selected materials from around the Arab world. Al-Kitaab, Book Three (2nd Edition) will also be used, but not as a primary textbook.

N/A

 

Modern Standard Arabic Course Descriptions 

Modern Standard Arabic I (Arabic 101; 5 credits)
This course introduces the Arabic alphabet and sound system forms. Students will be given ample opportunity to practice and produce both the alphabet and the sound system; they will start developing their vocabulary via specific structures presented in the textbook. Students will learn simple grammatical structures and gradually listen to authentic and instructional materials that come with the textbook. Most of the exercises and the activities are task-based and student-centered. The course will cover the material in Alif Baa and Al-Kitaab, Part One, Second Edition, Chapters 1-5. By the end of this course, students will be able to:
• Distinguish and pronounce all Arabic sounds;
• write accurately from dictation;
• initiate social interactions, ask for basic information, and be aware of basic cultural aspects of social interaction in the Arab world;
• talk about themselves, their education, and their family with native speakers of Arabic;
• comprehend simple written texts on familiar topics;
• comprehend simple audio/video texts on familiar topics;
• compose simple paragraphs about themselves; and
• be familiar with some of the differences between formal and spoken Arabic.

Primary textbooks for Arabic 101:
Alif Baa Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds, Second Edition, by Kristin Brustad, Mahmoud Al-Batal and Abbas Al-Tonsi
Al-Kitaab fi Ta’allum Al Arabiya with DVDs A Textbook for Beginning Arabic: Part One, Second Edition, by Kristin Brustad, Mahmoud Al-Batal and Abbas Al-Tonsi
• Locally produced materials, selected by program faculty

Modern Standard Arabic II (Arabic 102; 5 credits)
This course consolidates material learned in Arabic 101, and introduces students to more advanced and more challenging linguistic and cultural material from Al-Kitaab, Part One, Second Edition, Chapters 6-13 as well as locally produced authentic materials. By the end of this course, students will be able to:
Activate the learned vocabulary through interactive activities;
• understand basic grammatical structures in Arabic;
• produce a lengthy descriptive and narrative discourse in speaking;
• express their opinions and show their preferences using structured language;
• follow and understand short written and spoken texts in the news in the TV;
• read mid-size texts, using skimming techniques appropriate for their level; and
• learn more aspects of Arabic culture.

Primary textbooks for Arabic 102:
Alif Baa Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds, Second Edition, by Kristin Brustad, Mahmoud Al-Batal and Abbas Al-Tonsi
Al-Kitaab fi Ta’allum Al Arabiya with DVDs A Textbook for Beginning Arabic: Part One, Second Edition, by Kristin Brustad, Mahmoud Al-Batal and Abbas Al-Tonsi
• Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic edited by J.M. Cowan
• Locally produced materials, selected by program faculty

Modern Standard Arabic III (Arabic 201; 5 credits)
This course is designed to reinforce all the linguistic skills at both the reception and production levels. Students will also get a wide exposure to many aspects of Arabic culture through integrated outings designed for them to practice Arabic language in genuine contexts. The material covered in this course is from Al-Kitaab Part One, Second Edition, Chapters 14-20. By the end of this course, students will be able to:
Use basic conversational tasks successfully in different social situations;
• understand and use basic grammatical rules;
• read mid-size texts;
• extract the main ideas of non-technical texts;
• extract the main points in video materials and be able to discuss important ideas;
• develop conversational skills using a variety of language functions (e.g., description, comparison, cause and effect, arguing for/against, etc.);
• engage in a variety of daily conversations;
• give short presentations on topics of interest;
• understand basic grammatical rules and structures in Modern Standard Arabic;
• converse in Arabic using a variety of language functions appropriate for their level; and
• acquire knowledge about major aspects of Arab and Islamic culture.

Primary textbooks for Arabic 201:
Al-Kitaab fi Ta’allum Al Arabiya with DVDs Part One, Second Edition, by Kristin Brustad, Mahmoud Al-Batal and Abbas Al-Tonsi
• Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic edited by J.M. Cowan
• Locally produced materials, selected by program faculty

Modern Standard Arabic IV (Arabic 202; 5 credits)
This course is a continuation of Arabic 201. Course objectives are seen in terms of students performing linguistic tasks successfully, gaining self-confidence, and expanding their risk-taking in real-life communicative situations. This course covers the material in Al-Kitaab, Part Two, Second Edition, Chapters 1-5. By the end of this course, students will be able to
Guess the meaning of new words from contexts;
• use skimming and scanning techniques;
• write short paragraphs correctly;
• read authentic material from Arabic advertisements, short narratives, descriptions of people and places, simple contemporary poetry, topics on Arab culture, etc;
• write both informal and formal letters;
• write medium length compositions on familiar topics, including descriptions, short narratives, etc;
• master and distinguish Arabic sentence structures;
• understand and construct simple paragraphs and simple texts;
• enrich his/her vocabulary;
• understand some Arabic spoken situations;
• read and understand short paragraphs and short texts;
• write correct sentences and correct paragraphs and short texts; and
• begin to acquire more developed ideas about Arab and Islamic Culture

Primary textbooks for Arabic 202:
Al-Kitaab fi Ta’allum Al Arabiya with DVDs Part Two, Second Edition, by Kristin Brustad, Mahmoud Al-Batal and Abbas Al-Tonsi
• Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic edited by J.M. Cowan
• Audio-visual materials, texts selected by faculty from Arabic newspapers and magazines, etc.

Modern Standard Arabic V (Arabic 301; 5 credits)
This course is designed to move learners from a stage where they have achieved the basic grammatical skills, to being able to use language in a wider cultural context. At this stage, learners will be widely exposed to the main issues related to the Arab world. This course adopts a skill-based approach in which learners gain mastery of the language through the use of authentic materials taken from various sources. Teaching techniques are student-centered, with the instructor as the facilitator, and the goal of teaching to make students independent users of Arabic. Encounters with Arab professionals and visits to relevant institutions will be integrated in the syllabus. Evaluation will be based on both achievement of syllabus materials and success in out of the classroom tasks. This course covers the material in Al-Kitaab, Part Two, Second Edition, Chapters 6-10. By the end of this course, students will be able to:
• Understand more complex grammatical structures;
• listen to daily news, lectures, take notes, and make comments;
• describe elaborately things that are close to them;
• compare issues and show their preferences;
• express their own viewpoints and defend them; and
• linguistically behave appropriately in various situations.

Primary textbooks for Arabic 301:
Al-Kitaab fi Ta’allum Al Arabiya with DVDs Part Two, Second Edition, by Kristin Brustad, Mahmoud Al-Batal and Abbas Al-Tonsi
• Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic edited by J.M. Cowan
• Audio-visual materials, texts selected by faculty from Arabic newspapers and magazines, etc.


Modern Standard Arabic VI (Arabic 302; 5 credits)
This course provides additional practice at the advanced level to help students attain a higher level of skill development (e.g., listening, speaking, reading and writing) and linguistic accuracy. This course covers the material in Al-Kitaab, Part Three, Second Edition, Chapters 1-5, with local supplementary materials. By the end of this course, students will be able to:
• Expand more essential vocabulary that helps them to cope with topics of professional interest;
• obtain information, to understand the ideas presented in a text, to discover the author’s point of view and to seek evidence for their point of view;
• enrich their grammatical knowledge and apply it as one of the analytical tools in comprehending reading texts;
• produce lengthy descriptive and argumentative discourse in speaking;
• summarize texts and express their points of view in writing and speaking; and
• interact with native speakers and engage in discussions of contemporary issues.

Primary textbooks for Arabic 302:
Al-Kitaab fi Ta’allum Al Arabiya with DVDs Part Three, Second Edition, by Kristin Brustad, Mahmoud Al-Batal and Abbas Al-Tonsi
• Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic edited by J.M. Cowan
• Audio-visual materials, texts selected by faculty from Arabic newspapers and magazines, etc.

Directed Studies in Arabic (Arabic 401; 3 credits)
In this course, students use authentic material from literature, academic research and both print and electronic media to develop their abilities to extract essential information and identity linguistic nuances. Students are expected to produce reaction papers where they express their own assessment of the content, the form of the text and the position and the arguments of the author. Students also are expected to be able to identify figures of style and produce texts demonstrating near native competence.

Teaching Materials will consist of faculty selected materials from around the Arab world. Al-Kitaab, Book Three (2nd Edition) will also be used, but not as a primary textbook.

Colloquial Moroccan Arabic Course Descriptions

Colloquial Moroccan Arabic I (Arabic 110; 1 credit)
Students are introduced to words, expressions, and structures used frequently in everyday life. Students practice them in class before they are given assignments to carry out with native speakers in real situations. Evaluation combines performance in class and successful interaction with Moroccans. By the end of the course, students are able to ask essential questions and understand the responses, express basic facts and opinions in simple sentences, and engage in basic conversations in Moroccan Arabic with native speakers. Living with a Moroccan family or in a student residence hall with Moroccan students provides daily opportunity for practice.

Colloquial Moroccan Arabic II (Arabic 210; 1 credit)
Students who have already studied Modern Standard Arabic are introduced to words, expressions, and structures used frequently in everyday life in Morocco. Students practice them in class before they are given assignments to carry out with native speakers in real situations. Evaluation combines performance in class and successful interaction with Moroccans. By the end of the course, students are able to ask essential questions and understand the responses, express facts and opinions in simple as well as complex sentences, and engage in conversations in Moroccan Arabic with native speakers about non-academic topics. Living with a Moroccan family or in a student residence hall with Moroccan students provides daily opportunity for practice.

Colloquial Moroccan Arabic III (Arabic 310; 1 credit)
Students with a strong background in Modern Standard Arabic are introduced to vocabulary, expressions, and structures used frequently in Moroccan everyday life. Students practice them in class before they are given assignments to carry out with native speakers in real situations. Evaluation combines performance in class and successful interaction with Moroccans. By the end of the course, students are able to ask questions and understand the responses, express facts and opinions in complex sentences, and engage in conversations in Moroccan Arabic with native speakers about a wide range of topics, both academic and non-academic. Living with a Moroccan family or in a student residence hall with Moroccan students provides daily opportunity for practice.

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