Course Catalog

Course Finder Intro

This page contains descriptions for AMIDEAST courses across program sites.

  • Arabic Language Courses (Modern Standard and Colloquial Arabic) are offered at a variety of levels each term. Media Arabic courses are also offered during most semesters. For more information about AMIDEAST’s approach to Arabic, please visit this page
  • Area Studies Courses vary by term. AMIDEAST selects a series of courses from the larger catalog to offer each semester. The courses listed here do not represent final offerings for any given term, but rather are intended to give a general sense of the scope and focus of programs. Courses change regularly based on student interest and professor availability. Approximately 6-8 weeks before the start of the semester, students are sent a list of courses that will be offered during the upcoming term.
  • Syllabi from past terms can be made available to assist students with course pre-approval.

Key for Programs: A&A = Area & Arabic Language Studies (Semester), RSF = Regional Studies in French (Semester), IA = Intensive Arabic (Summer), and MAC = Moroccan Arabic and Culture (Short-Term)

Note: You may use the features below to search for courses specific to countries, programs, or subject. To select more than, one use the Ctrl key. 

Title Country Subject Term Program Course Code
WMST 312: Sexualité, Femme et Religion dans le Monde Arabo-Islamique (Women’s Studies 312; 3 credits - taught in French)
Ce cours présentera les relations qui existent entre les thématiques sensibles de la sexualité, de la femme et de la religion en Islam. A partir d’études anthropo-sociologiques de terrain, le cours présentera des données qualitatives et quantitatives sur ces trois champs du savoir. Il montrera aussi comment les champs de la sexualité et de la femme sont régulés par la religion au niveau des normes tout en s’en libérant au niveau des pratiques sans pour autant atteindre le stade de la sécularisation.
Sexualité, Femme et Religion dans le Monde Arabo-Islamique Morocco Women’s Studies Semester RSF WMST 312
WMST 330: Women and Society in the Arab World (Women’s Studies 330, 3 credits)
 Relations of power and privilege shape how we perceive and understand gender in the “Middle East” (and everything in the universe in fact). With this in mind, in this course we will consider how genders and sexualities have been constructed in diverse and dynamic ways across this region. Using feminist and postcolonial theories as modes of inquiry we will survey academic, journalistic, political and artistic work on gender in the context of familial, sexual, communal, economic, legal, religious, political and military relations. Endeavoring to move beyond the titillating debates about “saving Muslim women,” we will develop contextualized understandings of how the lives and societies of people in and from this region are shaped by gender. 
Women and Society in the Arab World Jordan Women’s Studies Semester A&A WMST 330
WMST 311: Gender, Islam, and Society (Women’s Studies 311; 3 credits)
This course will take a multidisciplinary look at gender within the context of Muslim majority countries with a particular focus on Morocco. A major part of the course will be fieldwork oriented. Some of the class sessions will be visits to women’s associations, both secular and Islamic.  Discussion will focus on the processes of empowerment and disempowerment that are engendered by Islamic and secular women’s activism in Morocco. The overall objective is introduce students to contemporary scholarship on women’s issues, feminist activism in both a secular and Islamic context and the nature of women’s engagement with power in the Islamic world.  In addition to fieldwork visits to some Moroccan women’s associations, students will read texts written by academic and activist feminists.
Gender, Islam, and Society Morocco Women’s Studies Semester A&A WMST 311
WMST 311: Femmes, Islam et  Politique (Women’s Studies 311; 3 credits - taught in French)
Le cours adoptera une approche  pluridisciplinaire aux questions relatives au genre dans le contexte des pays à majorité musulmane en générale et du Maroc en particulier. Nous allons lire des textes écrits par des académiciens et activistes œuvrant pour les droits des femmes, qui adoptent différentes positions en ce qui concerne  l`islam et les droits humains des femmes. En plus d`étudier et de discuter des textes érudits sur le genre et l`islam, une grande partie du cours prendra la forme de travail de terrain, notamment par la visite d`associations féministes ou féminines à caractère séculier ou islamique/islamistes. Le but est d`avoir une idée globale de la diversité de l`activisme féminin au Maroc et des différents chemins empruntés dans le processus de réforme.
Femmes, Islam et Politique Morocco Women’s Studies Semester RSF WMST 311
SOCY 370: Globalization and Social Change in the Arab World (Sociology 370; 3 credits)
The process of globalization is creating new economic, political and social realities throughout the world. Arab societies are no exception. The impact there is seen in the transformation of the temporal and spatial organization of social relations and transcations, generating transcontinental or interregional flows and netowrks of activity, interaction and power. This course investigates various perspectives on globalization and social change in the Arab world. It examines the nexus between economic and political globalization and the societal consequences of globalization in different parts of the region as well as varied responses to the forces and challenges of globalization in the diverse geographic and culture parts of the Arab world.
Globalization and Social Change in the Arab World Jordan Sociology Semester A&A SOCY 370
RELG 380: Political Islam (Religion 380, 3 credits)
The overarching goal of this course is to provide students with a historical and thematic survey of political Islamic thought, paying particular attention to the sociopolitical circumstances in which its pioneering thinkers and movements operated, how they articulated an understanding of Islam that could speak to the problems of their times and, perhaps most significantly, how they (re)interpreted Islamic texts, history and categories in order to legitimate their respective understandings of Islam. “Political Islam” is a term that has dominated public debate, particularly after momentous historical events, from the Iranian Revolution in 1979 to 9/11 to the ongoing Arab Spring. But what, exactly, is this phenomenon? Why did it arise? Who are its principal thinkers and from which segment of the population does it draw the bulk of its support? How does it organize itself? What are its national, global, social, economic and gendered demands? Indeed, to what extent can we refer to political Islam as a single movement – “it” – and, if we cannot, what binds diverse political Islamic groups together? That is, what sets them apart (despite their differences) from other political parties in Muslim societies? This course will engage these questions by offering both a historical and thematic survey of political Islamic thought.
Political Islam Jordan Religion Semester A&A RELG 380
POLS 361: Le Maroc et l'Afrique (Political Science 361; 3 credits - taught in French)
Outre les dimensions méditerranéenne et arabo-musulmane de l'Afrique du Nord, ce cours vise à démontrer l’enracinement de cette région, principalement le Maroc, dans le continent africain. Il nous permet également de retracer l'histoire générale des relations globales entre les deux espaces en espérant parvenir à une meilleure compréhension du continent africain dans sa multiplicité humaine et culturelle. En outre, le cours offre une approche plus pragmatique des questions politiques et sécuritaires africaines contemporaines par rapport à une histoire et des passés différents.
Le Maroc et l'Afrique Morocco Political Science Semester RSF POLS 361
RELG 340: Islamic Reform and Islamism (Religion 340; 3 semester credits)
Since the 19th century, Islamic reformism has emerged as a response to the challenges of modern times in the Islamic world.  Muslim intellectuals presented a number of theories to explain the relative decline of Islamic civilization vis à vis the West.  As a result, reforming Islam and improving the living standards of contemporary Muslims have become fundamental issues in Islamic thought.  This course examines the different responses and attitudes expressed by eminent Islamic modernist thinkers and the religious movements that have emerged over the past two centuries – conservative, fundamentalist, Salafist, Islamist, and radical to name a few – and their approaches to the reformation of Islamic thought and action.
Islamic Reform and Islamism Morocco Religion Semester A&A RELG 340
RELG 335: Women in Islam (Religion 335; 3 credits)
This course aims to examine the position of women in Islam. Using a mixture of historical and textual material, this course begins by investigating how the foundational texts of the Islamic faith (the Qur’an and the Hadith) have impacted the lives of women. The course will examine the impact ontologically, legally, and socially. We will touch upon how these texts were interpreted and applied in different historical epochs, with a focus on the modern context and how these texts are used to understand contemporary women’s issues such as identity, family, education, and public roles. As part of this course students learn to critically analyze the foundational texts and explain the development of Muslim women’s roles and identities.
Women in Islam Jordan Religion Semester A&A RELG 335
RELG 330: Contemporary Islamic Thought (Religion 330, 3 credits)
This course is an introduction course to contemporary Islamic thought. The central concern is the study of the ideational progress in Islamic thought. It provides an overview of main ideas and issues that have influenced Islamic thinking and Muslim politics over the last two centuries. In addition, the course will introduce leading and influential thinkers and texts that have played key roles in shaping the Muslim mind. While students are not expected to have specialized knowledge of Islamic thought, some background historical reading will help put the readings in context. Students will be introduced to various methodological and theoretical approaches in studying religious and political thought. The course will address the following themes: setting the stage, politics and debates in Islamic thought, Islamic theology and philosophy, modernity and traditionalism, key Islamic thinkers and important issues in Islamic thought including Ijtihad, democracy and human rights.
Contemporary Islamic Thought Jordan Religion Semester A&A RELG 330
RELG 315: Introduction to Islam (Religion 315; 3 credits)
A paradox confronts Islam: on the one hand, it is a major world religion, comprised of roughly 1.5 billion followers and yet, on the other, it is perhaps the most misunderstood religion of our time. The objective of this course is three-fold. Firstly, it aims to provide students with an informed understanding of the basic parameters of the Muslim faith, including its central beliefs and teachings, as expounded in the foundational text of Islam: the Qur’an. Secondly, it strives to inculcate in students a critical awareness of how diversely Islamic texts (and by extension Islam as a whole) have been interpreted by Muslim scholars, living in different contexts and facing different problems. Thirdly, the course seeks to expose students to what might be called “popular Islam”. That is, how has Islam been “lived out”, how has it been embodied in non-scholarly circles, in everyday popular practices, including visual art, oral culture and clothing? A core expectation is that, by semester’s end, students will come to appreciate how a particular understanding and practice of Islam – or, for that matter, of any religion – is inescapably shaped by human experiences, assumptions and choices.
Introduction to Islam Jordan & Morocco Religion Semester A&A RELG 315
RELG 310: Introduction a l’Islam (Religion 310; 3 credits -taught in French)
Ce cours offre une introduction à L'Islam comme une tradition religieuse prophétique. Il explore les différentes étapes de la naissance et l’évolution de cette religion et les façons dont les musulmans ont interprété et mis en pratique le message prophétique à travers des analyses historiques. Le cours essayera aussi d’expliquer les sources et de la religion qui gouverne la pratique religieuse au Maroc. Le cours se concentre en particulier sur les périodes classiques et modernes de l'histoire islamiques au Maroc comme exemple d’un Islam plus tolérant.
Introduction a l’Islam Morocco Religion Semester RSF RELG 310
POLS 390: Jordan in its Regional Context:  A Historical and Political Approach (Political Science 390; 3 credits)
The history of Jordan is in reality a history of the modern Middle East. The events that have transpired over the last hundred years, that have in fact shaped the region, are so interconnected with each other and with Jordan that by studying the history and politics of the country, one gains insight into the region as a whole. From the Arab Revolt against the Ottomans a century ago, to the creation of nation-states in the area, to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, to Arab wars and Arab peace with Israel, to strife and violence in neighboring Iraq, Syria and Egypt, to the Arab spring and political reform, and to the global war against terror, Jordan has consistently been involved. This course aims to acquaint students with the multitude of events and challenges that Jordan has faced over the years, how it has influenced and been influenced by them, how it has dealt with them, how it has been intricately engaged in them, and how it has survived them. By studying the modern history and politics of the country itself one will be able to learn about what Jordan is and develop a clearer and more comprehensive analysis of the region as a whole.
Jordan in its Regional Context: A Historical and Political Approach Jordan Political Science Semester A&A POLS 390
POLS 380: The Politics of Development in the Middle East (Political Science 380, 3 credits)
This course focuses on the politics of development in the Middle East and will address the theories and history of international development and implementation in the Arab region. The course is organized in a series of advanced seminars which rely on different theoretical frameworks. Paradigms of the historical-geographical relations between “developed” and “underdeveloped” societies will be discussed. In addition, the social processes at the root of inequalities between social groups and geographical regions will be analyzed and contemporary political and economic strategies will be critically assessed. Moreover, the course analyzes the cultural processes and the political strategies through which development policies are implemented. Students will examine the role of transnational institutions and civil society in sustaining development. The course examines the power dynamics, cultural processes, and hegemonic mechanisms at the basis of mainstream theories of development. Globalization and its dynamics will be assessed in order to unravel the contradictions that arise from an increasingly global, interconnected and integrated system that nevertheless engenders inequality and exclusion. The course provides a specific focus on the dynamics and processes of development in the Arab region. In doing so, the role of states in the area, the class relations, and the modes of production are critically examined. Students also have the opportunity to explore the concepts of globalization, neo-colonial practices and imperialism. The approach is primarily theoretical, with an emphasis on political mechanisms and global and regional economy, in an effort to challenge the concept and practice of development as it has been understood, theorized and practiced for the past fifty years.
The Politics of Development in the Middle East Jordan Political Science Semester A&A POLS 380
POLS 360: Morocco and Africa (Political Science 360; 3 credits)
Besides the Mediterranean or Arab-Muslim dimensions of North Africa, this course seeks to show the roots of this region in the African continent. It also allows us to trace the general history of relations between the two spaces hoping to reach a better understanding of the African continent in its human and cultural multiplicity. In addition, the course offers a more pragmatic approach to contemporary African issues in relation to different pasts and histories.
Morocco and Africa Morocco Political Science Semester A&A POLS 360
POLS 335: U.S. Relations with the Arab/Muslim World (Political Science 335; 3 credits)
This course will introduce students to United States relations with the Muslim world with a focus on the Maghreb. The Maghreb countries—Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, and Mauritania—have unique histories, politics, and cultures where contestation, change, and dynamic political culture affect domestic, regional, and international politics in misunderstood and underappreciated ways. Topics and approaches to these topics will include the politics and international relations of democratization in the Arab world, the history of Islam and Empire; the legacies of colonialism, nationalism, and postcolonialism (including subaltern studies); Islamism; women’s issues; the politics of identity; demographics and youth issues; U.S. perceptions of and relations with the Muslim world in the context of the war on terror; regional views of U.S. foreign policy; international political economy; and efforts at regional (re)integration. Core and primary source material will feature Maghrebi perspectives and debates and local political and cultural production.
U.S. Relations with the Arab/Muslim World Morocco Political Science Semester A&A POLS 335
POLS 330: International Politics in the Middle East and North Africa (Political Science 330; 3  credits)
This course focuses on the international politics of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) taking as its starting point the end of colonial rule in the region and the formation of new nation-states. The first part of the course is devoted to a methodological introduction of the study of the MENA region and aims at providing the conceptual frameworks and theories needed to define the MENA. Focusing on a more empirical analysis of the MENA’s political history, the second part of the course introduces and analyses the impact of Cold War dynamics on the region. It also examines the political economic and social transformations the region faced with the end of the Cold War and the emergence of a New World Order. After having examined the origins, causes, and consequences of the Israel/Palestine conflict in detail, the course examines important themes and debates in international politics of the MENA region, including gender and ideological movements. Finally, the current uprisings and their impact on the politics of the region are examined.
International Politics in the Middle East and North Africa Jordan Political Science Semester A&A POLS 330
POLS 325: The Arab Israeli Relations (Political Science 325, 3 credits)
This course provides an in-depth examination of the nature and dynamics of Arab Israeli politics. It explores some of the main approaches to understanding the political systems in Israel and the Arab States, with a focus on state formation, national identities, leadership, elites and ideologically-motivated terrorist violence.  It introduces students to the roots of the Arab Israeli conflict, including the two World Wars and their impact on the Middle East, the emergence of Zionism as a political force in Palestine, the emergence of Arab Nationalism as a  political force  in the region, the establishment of Israel and the wars that followed in 1948, 1956, 1967 and 1973 as well as peacemaking efforts including the Egyptian Israeli peace treaty, the Jordanian Israeli peace treaty, and the Oslo Accords between the Palestinians and Israel.  Cutting-edge issues in several of the disciplines comprising Arab Israeli studies will be surveyed by examining debates within the political literature on the area.  The phenomenon of Islamism and its relevance to Arab Israeli relations will be examined as well at the pertinent debates and what intellectual and political stakes they represent.  Students will be required to present analytical accounts and form original arguments of their own in class presentations and written assignments.
The Arab Israeli Relations Jordan Political Science Semester A&A POLS 325
POLS 320: International Relations in the Middle East and North Africa (Political Science 320; 3 credits)
This course examines the different kinds of hard and soft threats that prevail in the Middle East and North Africa in the post cold war era to enable students to analyze and be able to predict objectively the effects of these hard and soft threats on the regional and international systems. Specifically, the course will focuses on the major issues of hard and soft threats that have a bilateral and multilateral nature in the region. It will examine threats that have direct short-term and long-term devastating consequences that are measurable in number of casualties, demolition of infrastructure, and other long-term effects not only on regional but also international peace and security in post cold war era.
International Relations in the Middle East and North Africa Jordan Political Science Semester A&A POLS 320
POLS 315: Contemporary Issues in Jordan and the Arab World (Political Science 315; 3 credits)
This course will discuss the conceptual, historical, economic and cultural environment in which the contemporary Arab state system was established and has evolved. We will study the various political, social, and cultural trends which have contributed to the ways in which modern Arab World history has unfolded, highlighting such important themes as the changing relationship between the state and society; impact of Western economic, political and cultural might on the region; the search for political and cultural "authenticity" in response to the West; economic transformation and development; and the region's role in international relations. The various methodological paradigms that are employed in the study of the Arab world will be analyzed. It will offer an overview of Arab regimes, their emergence, consolidation, the role played by foreign powers in their creation and their final shaping. Using a comparative approach, we will investigate the formation of state and types of ruling regimes, societal power bases and systems, socio-political movements and ideologies, legitimacy and modern state power, and the scope and opportunities for political participation, liberalization and inclusion/exclusion. Basic concepts to be explored include power, elites, state, colonialism, nationalism, Islamic revivalism, democratization, human development, and gender issues.
Contemporary Issues in Jordan and the Arab World Jordan Political Science Semester A&A POLS 315
POLS 312: The Arab Spring:  Revolution and Reform in the Arab World (Political Science 312; 3 credits)
Beginning in December 2010, movements for political reform in the Arab world engulfed the region in a sea of change. This outpouring led to unprecedented outcomes across the region from the January 2011 Jasmine Revolution that forced Tunisia’s President Zine Eddine Ben Ali to flee to the Egyptian Revolution that toppled President Hosni Mubarak after 18 days of demonstrations centered in Cairo’s Tahrir Square. Protest movements seeking greater democracy and accountability arose in virtually every corner of the Arab world. The demands for change have led to both peaceful and violent demonstrations of varying intensity in Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, Jordan, Syria, Iraq, Kuwait, Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, Oman, and Yemen.  Students will examine the conditions that led to the Arab Spring uprisings through a series of case studies including Tunisia, Egypt, Jordan, Libya, Syria, Yemen and Bahrain. Topics covered include conditions that preceded the uprisings, regime reactions, the role of external players, and prospects for the future. 
The Arab Spring: Revolution and Reform in the Arab World Jordan Political Science Semester A&A POLS 312
POLS 310: Systèmes Politiques au Maghreb (Political Science 310; 3 credits - taught in French)
Ce cours s’intéresse aux systèmes politiques maghrébins en focalisant l’attention sur la vie politique depuis l’indépendance en Algérie, au Maroc et en Tunisie. Pour cet effet, le cours commence par un cadrage théorique et méthodologique par le traitement du concept de  "système politique", de "vie politique" et de "dynamique politiques" à l’œuvre dans les sociétés maghrébines de nos jours. Ensuite,  il étudie le contexte historique nord-africain depuis ​​le début du20éme siècle, et esquisse les conditions générales qui ont conditionné  le processus de formation et d'évolution des Etats du Maghreb. Pour ce faire, les mouvements sociaux, politiques et culturels dans les trois pays seront étudiés, à savoir les mouvements nationalistes, les mouvements Amazighs (surtout en Algérie et au Maroc), les mouvements féministes, et finalement les mouvements des jeunes pour la démocratie.
 
Le reste du cours se concentre sur le système politique marocain et son évolution depuis l'indépendance (1956) à nos jours (2011). Du point de vue socio-historique, cette partie du cours étudiera le passage de l'autoritarisme à la démocratie à travers l'institutionnalisation progressive de la représentation des citoyens et la réforme constitutionnelle. L'interaction entre la monarchie, les partis politiques et la société civile seront également étudiées. L'objectif étant de mieux comprendre les subtilités du système politique marocain et l'actualité politique depuis l’adoption de la nouvelle constitution comme réaction aux demandes pressantes du mouvement du 20 Février appréhendé comme  prolongement des  actions collectives qui balayent les régimes autoritaires de la région MENA.
Systèmes Politiques au Maghreb Morocco Political Science Semester RSF POLS 310
POLS 310: Political Systems of the Maghrib (Political Science 310; 3 credits)
 This course is an overview of Maghribi politics with a focus on the political dynamics and system of post-independence Morocco.  It begins with the historical background of the region (Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia, Libya) focusing on the 20th century. Then it moves on to an outline of the general conditions that shape the formation of modern Maghribi states: colonial and international interests, regional geopolitics, anti-colonialism and the impact of Arab nationalism, cultural factors including Berberism, the conflict over the western Sahara and the rise of Islamism. Case studies of Maghribi political systems will create a comparative perspective with other states in the Arab world.  Following this introductory and comparative look, the course will focus on the Moroccan political system from the 1950s to the present. In a historical perspective, this part will investigate the evolution of the kingdom from the authoritarianism of the “years of lead” to a relative democracy at the turn of the century. This course will examine also the interplay of the monarchy, the political parties, civil society organizations and the Islamist movements.
Political Systems of the Maghrib Morocco Political Science Semester A&A POLS 310
MENA 399: Independent Study Project (ISP) Seminar (MENA Studies 399, 3 credits)
Using textual or material resources, interviews, field observations, and/or other techniques, students  deeply explore a topic or issue in Middle East Studies through a self-designed independent study project (ISP).  Meeting weekly, the interdisciplinary ISP seminar is organized as a directed workshop including a combination of readings, discussion, writing, and students’ joint evaluation of each other’s works-in-progress. The assigned reading for the ISP seminar is light. Most of the readings are student generated through their own library research and through consultation with local scholars or professionals whose expertise most closely matches the proposed study.  Students work independently, carrying out work in a timely fashion, as assignments that factor into the final product will be due periodically. Class participation includes in-class peer evaluations in which students demonstrate a general understanding of the research process through the constructive criticism of their peers’ work.  Individual conferences with the professor on student progress will complement the directed workshop discussions and are integrated in the course schedule. Please note that this course is only taught periodically during fall semesters.
Independent Study Project (ISP) Seminar Jordan MENA Studies Semester A&A MENA 399
MENA 390: Community-Based Learning in the MENA Region (MENA Studies 390, 3 credits)
This course is designed to enhance students’ critical and analytical intercultural communication skills with the aim of developing intercultural competence. This is accomplished through course work and practical engagement with host country society in private, official, and semi-official environments. Guided and facilitated by the course instructor, students are expected to spend a minimum of six to seven hours at their community placement work-site each week and submit journal entries reflecting on their experiences. At the end of the semester they design and deliver a final Community-Based Learning project to be shared with a larger audience. Through their experiential education, students develop their intercultural competence which is a valuable asset in the global marketplace.
Community-Based Learning in the MENA Region Jordan & Morocco MENA Studies Semester A&A and RSF MENA 390
MENA 330: Contemporary Jordanian Culture (MENA Studies 330, 3 credits)
The course provides an in-depth overview of major trends in contemporary Jordanian culture.  Representative samples from a wide range of cultural manifestations will be studied.   These include relevant selections from the domains of art, music, fashion, cuisine, drama, cinema, media, architecture, and – to a lesser extent – politics and interfaith dialogue, based on students' interests.  In addition to class work, students will be able to meet with a number of invited guests and visit a number of sites and institutions.  Students are expected to keep a journal in which they record their notes, queries, observations and critiques.  We will also be examining various cultural discourses, to facilitate not only our discussion and conception of what is "Jordanian" or "Arab" but also our discussion of the problems of examining and studying contemporary Arab culture from a Western perspective.  Since no cultural product is divorced from the historical, social, political and economic context in which it is created, we will read various secondary materials on these subjects at the outset of the course. 
Contemporary Jordanian Culture Jordan MENA Studies Semester A&A MENA 330
MENA 320: Perspectives on Social Policy in Jordan (MENA Studies; 3 credits)
This course examines theories, concepts and major contemporary issues in social policy. It aims at providing students with an understanding of the principal areas addressed in the study of social policy such as social services, social problems, social disadvantage and the systems necessary to address them. It looks into how social disadvantage, services, and problems are usually addressed predominantly by governments but also by some partners that have become increasingly important for governments to work with such as NGOs and communities. The course reviews the major areas included in social services (such as health administration, education, social protection); social problems (such as disability, unemployment, and old age); and social disadvantage (such as gender and poverty). Using the Jordanian context, it will look into the legal framework used to address such issues as well as how the various players attempt to contribute to human wellbeing. This would enable the students to examine social policies within their actual context. The course will be delivered both through lectures and through using interactive teaching tools to help students become active learners, develop their analytical and evaluative skills, and encourage them to go beyond initial reactions to complex issues. Some guests might be invited from relevant organizations for Q&A sessions with the students.
Perspectives on Social Policy in Jordan Jordan MENA Studies Semester A&A MENA 320
MENA 311: Amazigh History and Culture (MENA Studies 311; 3 credits)
This course outlines the history of the Imazighen (or Berbers, North Africa’s indigenous people) since ancient times. It covers how early Berbers founded the scattered Libyan kingdoms of classical antiquity, later interacting with outsiders (Phoenician, Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Vandal, Byzantine) until the decisive Arab conquest. It then traces their adaptation to Arab culture and Islam, highlighted by the prestigious medieval Berber empires that made a bilingual Arabo-Berber Morocco a force to be reckoned with in the Mediterranean world, and the all-pervading growth of Sufism, before an inward-looking sultanate in decline (XVIIth-XIXth centuries) paved the way for colonial domination. The remainder of the course is devoted to the linguistic erosion suffered by the Berber tongue, the anti-colonial resistance period (1908-1934), not to mention the Amazigh renaissance of the post-1980s and today’s identity crisis. Although not a language course, some rudiments of Tamazight (Berber) will be imparted, together with its oral poetry. 
Amazigh History and Culture Morocco MENA Studies Semester A&A MENA 311
MENA 310: Contemporary Moroccan Culture (MENA Studies 310; 3 credits)
This course introduces visiting US-American students to the different facets of contemporary Moroccan culture. Being caught between the North and the South, the East and the West, Moroccan culture has embraced a wide diversity of cultural variants and has integrated them into a homegrown cultural hybrid. Pre-Islamic, African, Berber, European, and modern technological cultures have intermingled to create contemporary Moroccan society. This hybridizing process has resulted in a number of fascinating mixes and paradoxes (linguistic, cultural, religious, ethnic, and political). Among the topics covered in this course are Moroccan traditional culture in the cyber age; current popular culture: religious rituals; youth culture; media culture of newspapers, T.V., and radio stations; the impact of modernization on Moroccan social practices; perceptions of time, space and the body; changes in the culture of womanhood; recent reforms in Morocco (education, women, human rights, labor laws); culture of dress, fashion, and traditional clothing; arts, music, and painting; intellectual production in different areas; the language question (Arabic, Amazigh, French, English…); and facing globalization: the Moroccans' conception of the past, the present, and the future (religious, cultural, philosophical, and political implications).
Contemporary Moroccan Culture Morocco MENA Studies Semester A&A MENA 310
HIST 380: Colonialism in Middle East and North Africa (History 380; 3 credits)
This course focuses on French and British colonial theory and practice in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). After a general introduction to the history of colonialism, the course will examine French policy in Algeria, Morocco, and Syria-Lebanon in the first half of the semester. The second part of the semester will focus on British strategy in India and Iraq. The purpose of this comparative analysis is to show that, beyond the singular purpose of hegemonic control over specific colonial territories and subjects in the MENA region, French and British strategies tactics and goals were quite often dissimilar. The course will examine how this difference id due as much to the peculiar histories and philosophical outlooks of both 19th and early 20th century powers, as to the countries they colonized. Indeed, if there were any similarities in French and British attempts to control local societies, these may have arisen as a result of the often violent reaction to foreign rule from supposedly subordinate societies. This course will examine the chain of responses—literary, economic, social and finally military and political—that developed in the colonized regions as a result of the land grabs, cultural disruption, geographic reconfigurations, political calamities, and the final dissolution of once-mighty land empire.
Colonialism in Middle East and North Africa Jordan History Semester A&A HIST 380
HIST 320: The Islamic World and the West (History 320; 3 credits)

In this course, students will examine the historical relations between the “Islamic World” and “the West” from the 7th century to the present. This course will explore the emergence of Islam in Arabia and the subsequent conquests of the Arabs to different areas in the Middle East, Parts of Central Asia, North Africa, Spain and Sicily. Students will learn about both moments of peaceful socio-cultural and economic interactions, as well as confrontations and ideological conflicts with the West. The course will take a political, social, and cultural history approach to understanding the nature of the relationship between Muslims and Europeans. In addition, a world history perspective will be employed in order to look at these complex and multilayered interactions. The course will also examine major epistemological questions that have framed the perceptions of these interactions over time and the ideological construction of the “other”. This course will also examine the history and impact of colonialism on the politics, culture, urbanism and the society in the region. Finally, the course will look at the impact of recent events such as the rise of al-Qaeda, the September 11, 2001 attacks, and the Arab Spring on relations between the Islamic World and the West. 

 

The Islamic World and the West Morocco History Semester A&A HIST 320
HIST 310: The Arab Gulf and the Indian Ocean: History and Current Issues (History; 3 credits)
This course aims to introduce students to the nature of the social, economic and political relations that connected the Gulf to the Western Indian Ocean from the sixteenth century onwards. Emphasis will be placed on the social, economic, religious and political currents that influenced the peoples of southwest Asia (or the Western Indian Ocean) on a regional scale. While the European colonial impact on the Gulf as well as on Southwest Asia will be a major focus, attention will also be placed on patterns and currents that predated the European intervention, and subsisted long after the Western impact had diminished.
The Arab Gulf and the Indian Ocean: History and Current Issues Jordan History Semester A&A HIST 310
FREN 411: Litteratures Francophones du Maghreb (French 411; 3 credits - taught in French)

Ce cours s’adresse aux étudiants qui souhaitent :

  • écouvrir une nouvelle forme d’écriture romanesque francophone du Maroc,
  • améliorer leur prise de parole en français, 
  • aborder la littérature comme vecteur permettant d’interroger une société et à travers elle, un mode de pensée et de culture artistique, religieuse, spirituelle et mythique.

 Ce séminaire vise à :

  • Introduire brièvement l’historique des littératures francophones du Maroc (histoire du protectorat français, mouvements politiques marocains et internationaux qui ont déterminé l’engagement en littérature).
  • Analyser progressivement les livres au programme en invitant à découvrir différents modes d’écriture littéraires (intertextualité, exil, choix de la langue d’écriture de l’écrivain, religions, mythes, quête de l’identité, etc.).
  • Mettre en confiance les étudiants pour s’exprimer plus facilement en français et pour les encourager à débattre et écrire dans cette langue qu’ils cherchent à maîtriser.

 

Litteratures Francophones du Maghreb Morocco French Semester A&A and RSF FREN 411
ENVR 330: Green and Social Innovation in the Arab World (Environmental Studies 330, 3 credits)
This course will identify, explore, and emphasize the linkages between various development sectors and environmental and social values in the Arab region. Students will analyze changes in market and social dynamics which are leading to the positioning of green/social leadership and innovation as an opportunity for development in Arab countries. The course will highlight environmental stewardship, eco-design and innovation, and social entrepreneurship as practical means to deploy sustainable development principles. Students will explore the revival of social movements and locally-generated solutions which aim to achieve balance between economic, social, and environmental considerations. The analysis of this course will feature the challenges and opportunities for green/social innovation, different applications around the Arab world, the anticipated impact on job creation and local development, as well as the longer term benefits to communities - in particular women and youth empowerment. Case studies from Jordan and other countries from within and outside the Arab world will be used to demonstrate different models and to help students understand impact.
Green and Social Innovation in the Arab World Jordan Environmental Studies Semester A&A ENVR 330
ENVR 320: Environmental Drivers of Change in the Middle East (Environmental Studies 320, 3 credits)
This course identifies, explores and highlights the linkages between natural resource use and political, economic and social dynamics in the Middle East. The analysis will feature both intra-state and inter-state dynamics with a focus on the degree to which natural resource endowment/scarcity contributes to the state of development in Arab countries, with special attention to Jordan. The course will be divided to three interconnected phases:
  • General description of the environmental geography, environment, and sustainable development context in the Middle East based on recent scientific figures and trends.
  • In-depth analysis of various environmental and natural resource issues in the region and their relationship to the socio-economic and political context; among the specific issues to be considered will be water, energy, food, health, population, urbanization, ecosystems and biodiversity, and climate change).
  • Consideration of the future of the Middle East in relation to various scenarios related to sustainable vs. wasteful use of natural resources and peace/conflict options.
During the course several case studies will be used to illustrate the linkages discussed including the potential role of natural resource (mis)governance to the rise and spread of the Arab Spring since 2011.
Environmental Drivers of Change in the Middle East Jordan Environmental Studies Semester A&A ENVR 320
ECON 340: Le Maroc et l'Europe: Economie et Politique (Economics 340; 3 credits - taught in French)
Ce cours vise à décrire et à analyser les différentes étapes de la politique européenne à l'égard du Maroc et ce, plus précisément depuis le processus de Barcelone de 1995. Cette politique économique est jalonnée par un certain nombre d'enjeux, de contraintes et d'opportunités pour les deux parties marocaine et européenne. Le cours visera à la fois une analyse critique de cette politique et tentera d'aborder l'implicite de cette politique en termes d'intérêts différentiés/mutuels que de valeurs partagées.
Le Maroc et l'Europe: Economie et Politique Morocco Economics Semester RSF ECON 340
ECON 321: Développement économique au Moyen-Orient et en Afrique du Nord (Economie 321; 3 crédits - taught in French)

Ce cours examine les sujets relatifs au développement social, économique et politique dans la région "Middle East and North Africa (MENA) en se référant au royaume du Maroc comme étude de cas. Les étudiants sont exposés à des sujets qui les encouragent à explorer la région MENA, en utilisant des exemples liés à des problèmes pratiques. Les étudiants sont également amenés à mener des recherches qui leur permettent d'approfondir leurs connaissances sur le sujet.

Les questions traitées portent sur des questions liées au développement économique et socio-politique récent dans la région MENA, en mettant l'accent sur les défis internes auxquels sont confrontés de nombreux pays de la région ainsi que l'impact lié à l'évolution de l'environnement externe.

Le «printemps arabe» a révélé la nécessité de repenser le modèle de développement poursuivi par les pays de la région MENA et d'adopter de nouvelles formes de gouvernance. Le recours à une nouvelle génération de réformes est essentiel afin d'assurer une insertion des pays de la région dans le système mondialisé et de renforcer leur résilience aux chocs extérieurs (économique, financière, etc.). Durant les présentations, les étudiants sont invités à discuter des points de vue divergents afin de renforcer leurs compétences de critique et d'argumentation. 

 
Développement économique au Moyen-Orient et en Afrique du Nord Morocco Economics Semester RSF ECON 321
ECON 320: Economic Development in the Middle East and North Africa (Economics 320; 3 credits)
This course will explore issues relating to social, economic and political development in the MENA region through a multidisciplinary lens. And, as the course also aims to address the practical side of implementing development, it will depend on augmenting the classroom activities with field visits to and guest speakers from a variety of organizations working in the field of development. Students will be given indicative readings on the topics and encouraged to explore them more widely, especially by using examples of practical problems and policy questions, seeking primary data sources and reports. There are no particular prerequisites for this course; however elementary social science studies obtained in disciplines such as economics or politics or an interest in contemporary Middle East issues can be considered as foundational assets for the student. The course may also be of interest to students who are undertaking disciplinary social science degrees and who are interested in “Third World” politics or economics.
Economic Development in the Middle East and North Africa Jordan & Morocco Economics Semester A&A ECON 320
ART 350: Traditional Islamic Arts (Art 350, 3 credits)
This course introduces students to the study of traditional Islamic art in two dimensions.  The first dimension focuses on the basic concepts of the sacred geometry that is the basis of traditional Islamic art. The second consists of a practical art project in two media:  illumination & zillij (mosaic tile work). In the first dimension, students study the underlying principles of sacred geometry and practice the production of those geometric patterns that recur in traditional Islamic art forms. This is done, in part, through the repeated drawing of circles from which the traditional Islamic geometric patterns emerge. In the second module, more complex patterns will be used to create a work combining all three representations of Islamic art – geometry, calligraphy, and biomorphic motifs. 
 
By the end of the course, students will understand the design principles in Islamic art by studying the sacred geometry. Students will also have experience with two different materials and the traditional methods of working with these materials to produce an art work. In addition to producing the art pieces, students will create a portfolio which documents their journey throughout the course.
Traditional Islamic Arts Jordan Art Semester A&A ART 350
ARAB 401: Directed Studies in Arabic (Arabic 401; 5 credits)
In this course, students use authentic material from literature, academic research and both print and electronic media to develop their abilities to extract essential information and identity linguistic nuances. Students are expected to produce reaction papers where they express their own assessment of the content, the form of the text and the position and the arguments of the author. Students also are expected to be able to identify figures of style and produce texts demonstrating near native competence.  Teaching materials will consist of faculty selected materials from around the Arab world. This course may be repreated for credit up to three times.
Directed Studies in Arabic Jordan & Morocco Arabic Sem & Sum A&A and IA ARAB 401
ARAB 335: Colloquial Jordanian Arabic III (Arabic 335; 3 credits)
Pre-requisite: ARAB 235, ARAB 236, or ARAB 237 (or the equivalent)
Co-requisite: ARAB 201, ARAB 202, ARAB 301, ARAB 302, or ARAB 401
This course is intended for students who have already studied two terms of Jordanian dialect and have studied Modern Standard Arabic for several terms.  This course prepares the student to absorb most of the main ideas and details in continuous speech in colloquial Arabic on various topics, both academic and non-academic. This course enables the student to use vocabulary, expressions, and structures used frequently in everyday life at an advanced level. The student also learns to contribute to conversations on a variety of familiar topics, with a high degree of accuracy, clarity and precision. This course also aims to make students readily understood by native speakers unaccustomed to dealing with non-native speakers.  Additionally, students are able to state an opinion or cite conditions.  This course may be repeated up to three times.
Colloquial Jordanian Arabic III Jordan Arabic Semester A&A ARAB 335
ARAB 330: Summer Colloquial Jordanian Arabic III (Arabic 330; 1 credit)
Pre-requisite: ARAB 230 or ARAB 270 (or the equivalent)
Co-requisite: ARAB 201, ARAB 202, ARAB 301, ARAB 302, or ARAB 401
This course is intended for students who have already studied two terms of Jordanian dialect and have studied Modern Standard Arabic for several terms.  This course prepares the student to absorb most of the main ideas and details in continuous speech in colloquial Arabic on various topics, both academic and non-academic. This course enables the student to use vocabulary, expressions, and structures used frequently in everyday life at an advanced level. The student also learns to contribute to conversations on a variety of familiar topics, with a high degree of accuracy, clarity and precision. This course also aims to make students readily understood by native speakers unaccustomed to dealing with non-native speakers.  Additionally, students are able to state an opinion or cite conditions.  This course may be repeated up to three times. 
Summer Colloquial Jordanian Arabic III Jordan Arabic Summer IA ARAB 330
ARAB 319: Colloquial Moroccan Arabic III (Arabic 319; 3 credits)
Co-requisite: ARAB 218, 219
This course prepares the student to absorb most of the main ideas and details in continuous speech on various topics both academic and non-academic. This course enables the student to use vocabulary, expressions, and structures used frequently in everyday life at an advanced level. The student also learns to contribute to conversations on a variety of familiar topics, with a high degree of accuracy, clarity and precision. Some example topics that are typically covered in this course include education and its problems as well as health and issues in local society. This course may be repeated for credit up to three times.
Colloquial Moroccan Arabic III Morocco Arabic Semester A&A and RSF ARAB 319
ARAB 315: Media Arabic II (Arabic 315; 3 credits; Prerequisite: Mastery of the material covered in AMIDEAST’s Arabic 215, Arabic 216, or the equivalent; Co-requisite Arabic 202 or higher)
This course exposes students to the Arabic used in the media. It focuses on mastering basic vocabulary commonly used in Arab print and electronic media, developing the ability to read and understand Arabic newspapers without using a dictionary, developing the ability to listen to radio and television news broadcasts, writing short summaries of news articles and broadcasts, and discussing current economic, political and social issues covered in the Arabic media. All of the material used is authentic, with an emphasis on the local opinion pieces and advanced news from local media. Typically only offered in the spring term when there is sufficient student interest.
 
Media Arabic II Jordan Arabic Semester A&A ARAB 315
ARAB 302: Modern Standard Arabic VI (Arabic 302; 5 credits)
This course provides additional practice at the advanced level to help students attain a higher level of skill development (e.g., listening, speaking, reading and writing) and linguistic accuracy. This course covers the material in Al-Kitaab, Part Three, Second Edition, Chapters 1-5, with local supplementary materials. By the end of this course, students will be able to:
• Expand more essential vocabulary that helps them to cope with topics of professional interest;
• obtain information, to understand the ideas presented in a text, to discover the author’s point of view and to seek evidence for their point of view;
• enrich their grammatical knowledge and apply it as one of the analytical tools in comprehending reading texts;
• produce lengthy descriptive and argumentative discourse in speaking;
• summarize texts and express their points of view in writing and speaking; and
• interact with native speakers and engage in discussions of contemporary issues.
Primary textbooks for Arabic 302:
• Al-Kitaab fi Ta’allum Al Arabiya with DVDs Part Three, Second Edition, by Kristin Brustad, Mahmoud Al-Batal and Abbas Al-Tonsi
• Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic edited by J.M. Cowan
• Audio-visual materials, texts selected by faculty from Arabic newspapers and magazines, etc.
Modern Standard Arabic VI Jordan & Morocco Arabic Sem & Sum A&A and IA ARAB 302
ARAB 301: Modern Standard Arabic V (Arabic 301; 5 credits)
This course is designed to move learners from a stage where they have achieved the basic grammatical skills, to being able to use language in a wider cultural context. At this stage, learners will be widely exposed to the main issues related to the Arab world. This course adopts a skill-based approach in which learners gain mastery of the language through the use of authentic materials taken from various sources. Teaching techniques are student-centered, with the instructor as the facilitator, and the goal of teaching to make students independent users of Arabic. Encounters with Arab professionals and visits to relevant institutions will be integrated in the syllabus. Evaluation will be based on both achievement of syllabus materials and success in out of the classroom tasks. This course covers the material in Al-Kitaab, Part Two, Second Edition, Chapters 6-10. By the end of this course, students will be able to:
• Understand more complex grammatical structures;
• listen to daily news, lectures, take notes, and make comments;
• describe elaborately things that are close to them;
• compare issues and show their preferences;
• express their own viewpoints and defend them; and
• linguistically behave appropriately in various situations.
Primary textbooks for Arabic 301:
• Al-Kitaab fi Ta’allum Al Arabiya with DVDs Part Two, Second Edition, by Kristin Brustad, Mahmoud Al-Batal and Abbas Al-Tonsi
• Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic edited by J.M. Cowan
• Audio-visual materials, texts selected by faculty from Arabic newspapers and magazines, etc.
 
Modern Standard Arabic V Jordan & Morocco Arabic Sem & Sum A&A and IA ARAB 301
ARAB 237: Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IIC (Arabic 237; 3 credits)
Pre-requisite: ARAB 138 (or the equivalent)
Co-requisite: ARAB 302 or ARAB 401
This course is intended for students who have already studied one term of Jordanian dialect and have studied Modern Standard Arabic for several terms.  Students with a strong background in Modern Standard Arabic develop the capacity to understand main ideas and details in continuous speech on various topics in colloquial Arabic. While full understanding is still limited, by the end of the course students are able to ask questions and understand the responses, express facts and opinions in complex sentences, and engage in conversations in colloquial Arabic with native speakers on a wide range of topics. This course enables the student to meet daily and situational needs and requirements of a study and work routine. Students learn to handle complex conversations with confidence and social attitudes in simple non-academic language. This course builds on vocabulary and concepts studied in previous Modern Standard and colloquial Arabic courses and allows for more advanced practice using colloquial dialect.
Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IIC Jordan Arabic Semester A&A ARAB 237
ARAB 236: Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IIB (Arabic 236; 3 credits)
Pre-requisite: ARAB 137 (or the equivalent)
Co-requisite: ARAB 202 or ARAB 301
This course is intended for students who have already studied one term of Jordanian dialect and have studied Modern Standard Arabic for several terms.  Students with a high-intermediate background in Modern Standard Arabic develop the capacity to understand main ideas and details in continuous speech on various topics in colloquial Arabic. While full understanding is still limited, by the end of the course students are able to ask questions and understand the responses, express facts and opinions in complex sentences, and engage in conversations in colloquial Arabic with native speakers on a wide range of topics. This course enables the student to meet daily and situational needs and requirements of a study and work routine. Students learn to handle complex conversations with confidence and social attitudes in simple non-academic language. This course builds on vocabulary and concepts studied in previous Modern Standard and colloquial Arabic courses and allows for more advanced practice using colloquial dialect.
Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IIB Jordan Arabic Semester A&A ARAB 236
ARAB 235: Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IIA (Arabic 235; 3 credits)
Pre-requisite: ARAB 135 or ARAB 136 (or the equivalent)
Co-requisite: ARAB 102 or ARAB 201
This course is intended for students who have already studied one term of Jordanian dialect and have limited experience with Modern Standard Arabic. This course aims to strengthen all-around proficiency and speaking skills in a wide range of daily situations and common tasks. The course prepares students to understand conversations about personal life and the surrounding environment. In addition, this course exposes the student to real-time speaking.  Students learn to converse and describe all major time frames (past, present, and future), as well as to contribute to conversations on a variety of familiar topics, with a high degree of accuracy, clarity and precision in the local dialect. This course builds on vocabulary and concepts studied in previous Modern Standard and colloquial Arabic courses and allows for more advanced practice using colloquial dialect.
Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IIA Jordan Arabic Semester A&A ARAB 235
ARAB 230: Summer Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IIA (Arabic 230; 1 credit)
Pre-requisite: ARAB 130 (or the equivalent)
Co-requisite: ARAB 102 or ARAB 201
This course is intended for students who have already studied one term of Jordanian dialect and have limited experience with Modern Standard Arabic.  This course aims to strengthen all-around proficiency and speaking skills in a wide range of daily situations and common tasks. The course prepares students to understand conversations about personal life and the surrounding environment. In addition, this course exposes the student to real-time speaking.  Students learn to converse and describe all major time frames (past, present, and future), as well as to contribute to conversations on a variety of familiar topics, with a high degree of accuracy, clarity and precision in the local dialect. This course builds on vocabulary and concepts studied in previous Modern Standard and colloquial Arabic courses and allows for more advanced practice using colloquial dialect.
Summer Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IIA Jordan Arabic Summer IA ARAB 230
ARAB 219: Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IIB (Arabic 219; 3 credits)
Pre-requisite: ARAB 119
In this course, the student develops the capacity to understand main ideas and details in continuous speech on various topics in colloquial Arabic. While full understanding is still limited, by the end of the course, students are able to ask questions and understand the responses, express facts and opinions in complex sentences, and engage in conversations in colloquial Arabic with native speakers on a wide range of topics. This course enables the student to meet daily and situational needs and requirements of a study and work routine. The student also can handle complex conversations with confidence and social attitudes in simple non-academic language. Some example topics that are typically covered in this course include descriptions, guidance, issues related to women and children, and topics related to the travel and immigration. Grammar will also be taught in this course as it relates to the above mentioned topics.
Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IIB Morocco Arabic Semester A&A and RSF ARAB 219
ARAB 202: Modern Standard Arabic IV (Arabic 202; 5 credits)
This course is a continuation of Arabic 201. Course objectives are seen in terms of students performing linguistic tasks successfully, gaining self-confidence, and expanding their risk-taking in real-life communicative situations. This course covers the material in Al-Kitaab, Part Two, Second Edition, Chapters 1-5. By the end of this course, students will be able to
• Guess the meaning of new words from contexts;
• use skimming and scanning techniques;
• write short paragraphs correctly;
• read authentic material from Arabic advertisements, short narratives, descriptions of people and places, simple contemporary poetry, topics on Arab culture, etc;
• write both informal and formal letters;
• write medium length compositions on familiar topics, including descriptions, short narratives, etc;
• master and distinguish Arabic sentence structures;
• understand and construct simple paragraphs and simple texts;
• enrich their vocabulary;
• understand some Arabic spoken situations;
• read and understand short paragraphs and short texts;
• write correct sentences and correct paragraphs and short texts; and
• begin to acquire more developed ideas about Arab and Islamic Culture
Primary textbooks for Arabic 202:
• Al-Kitaab fi Ta’allum Al Arabiya with DVDs Part Two, Second Edition, by Kristin Brustad, Mahmoud Al-Batal and Abbas Al-Tonsi
• Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic edited by J.M. Cowan
• Audio-visual materials, texts selected by faculty from Arabic newspapers and magazines, etc.
Modern Standard Arabic IV Jordan & Morocco Arabic Sem & Sum A&A and IA ARAB 202
ARAB 201: Modern Standard Arabic III (Arabic 201; 5 credits)
This course is designed to reinforce all the linguistic skills at both the reception and production levels. Students will also get a wide exposure to many aspects of Arabic culture through integrated outings designed for them to practice Arabic language in genuine contexts. The material covered in this course is from Al-Kitaab Part One, Second Edition, Chapters 14-20. By the end of this course, students will be able to:
• Use basic conversational tasks successfully in different social situations;
• understand and use basic grammatical rules;
• read mid-size texts;
• extract the main ideas of non-technical texts;
• extract the main points in video materials and be able to discuss important ideas;
• develop conversational skills using a variety of language functions (e.g., description, comparison, cause and effect, arguing for/against, etc.);
• engage in a variety of daily conversations;
• give short presentations on topics of interest;
• understand basic grammatical rules and structures in Modern Standard Arabic;
• converse in Arabic using a variety of language functions appropriate for their level; and
• acquire knowledge about major aspects of Arab and Islamic culture.
Primary textbooks for Arabic 201: 
• Al-Kitaab fi Ta’allum Al Arabiya with DVDs Part One, Second Edition, by Kristin Brustad, Mahmoud Al-Batal and Abbas Al-Tonsi
• Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic edited by J.M. Cowan
• Locally produced materials, selected by program faculty
Modern Standard Arabic III Jordan & Morocco Arabic Sem & Sum A&A and IA ARAB 201
ARAB 130: Summer Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IA (Arabic 130; 1 credit)
Co-requisite: ARAB 101 or ARAB 102
This course is intended for students who have no previous experience with Jordanian dialect and possess a beginning proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic.  Students are introduced to basic vocabulary, expressions, and grammar structures used frequently in the local environment. This course aims to help students reach a level where they are able to navigate a limited number of uncomplicated communicative tasks in colloquial Arabic in straightforward social situations. Conversation in this course focuses on real life exchanges with host country nationals on common topics key to basic functioning in the target language and culture. By the end of the course, students are able to ask essential questions and understand the responses, express basic facts and opinions in simple sentences, and engage in simple conversations in colloquial Arabic with native speakers.
Summer Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IA Jordan Arabic Summer IA ARAB 130
ARAB 102: Modern Standard Arabic II (Arabic 102; 5 credits) 
This course consolidates material learned in Arabic 101, and introduces students to more advanced and more challenging linguistic and cultural material from Al-Kitaab, Part One, Second Edition, Chapters 6-13 as well as locally produced authentic materials. By the end of this course, students will be able to:
• Activate the learned vocabulary through interactive activities;
• understand basic grammatical structures in Arabic;
• produce a lengthy descriptive and narrative discourse in speaking;
• express their opinions and show their preferences using structured language;
• follow and understand short written and spoken texts in the news in the TV;
• read mid-size texts, using skimming techniques appropriate for their level; and
• learn more aspects of Arabic culture.
Primary textbooks for Arabic 102:
• Alif Baa Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds, Second Edition, by Kristin Brustad, Mahmoud Al-Batal and Abbas Al-Tonsi
• Al-Kitaab fi Ta’allum Al Arabiya with DVDs A Textbook for Beginning Arabic: Part One, Second Edition, by Kristin Brustad, Mahmoud Al-Batal and Abbas Al-Tonsi
• Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic edited by J.M. Cowan
• Locally produced materials, selected by program faculty
Modern Standard Arabic II Jordan & Morocco Arabic Sem & Sum A&A and IA ARAB 102
ARAB 101: Modern Standard Arabic I (Arabic 101; 5 credits) 
This course introduces the Arabic alphabet and sound system forms. Students will be given ample opportunity to practice and produce both the alphabet and the sound system; they will start developing their vocabulary via specific structures presented in the textbook. Students will learn simple grammatical structures and gradually listen to authentic and instructional materials that come with the textbook. Most of the exercises and the activities are task-based and student-centered. The course will cover the material in Alif Baa and Al-Kitaab, Part One, Second Edition, Chapters 1-5. By the end of this course, students will be able to:
• Distinguish and pronounce all Arabic sounds;
• write accurately from dictation;
• initiate social interactions, ask for basic information, and be aware of basic cultural aspects of social interaction in the Arab world;
• talk about themselves, their education, and their family with native speakers of Arabic;
• comprehend simple written texts on familiar topics;
• comprehend simple audio/video texts on familiar topics;
• compose simple paragraphs about themselves; and
• be familiar with some of the differences between formal and spoken Arabic.
Primary textbooks for Arabic 101:
• Alif Baa Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds, Second Edition, by Kristin Brustad, Mahmoud Al-Batal and Abbas Al-Tonsi
• Al-Kitaab fi Ta’allum Al Arabiya with DVDs A Textbook for Beginning Arabic: Part One, Second Edition, by Kristin Brustad, Mahmoud Al-Batal and Abbas Al-Tonsi
• Locally produced materials, selected by program faculty
Modern Standard Arabic I Jordan & Morocco Arabic Sem & Sum A&A and IA ARAB 101
ARAB 310: Summer Colloquial Moroccan Arabic III (Arabic 340; 1 credit)
Pre-requisite: ARAB 210 or ARAB 240 (or the equivalent)
Co-requisite: ARAB 201, ARAB 202, ARAB 301, ARAB 302, or ARAB 401
This course is intended for students who have already studied two terms of Moroccan dialect and have studied Modern Standard Arabic for several terms.  This course prepares the student to absorb most of the main ideas and details in continuous speech in colloquial Arabic on various topics, both academic and non-academic. This course enables the student to use vocabulary, expressions, and structures used frequently in everyday life at an advanced level. The student also learns to contribute to conversations on a variety of familiar topics, with a high degree of accuracy, clarity and precision. This course aims also to make students readily understood by native speakers unaccustomed to dealing with non-native speakers and able to state an opinion or cite conditions.  This course may be repeated up to three times.
Summer Colloquial Moroccan Arabic III Morocco Arabic Summer IA ARAB 310
ARAB 270: Summer Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IIB (Arabic 270; 1 credit)
Pre-requisite: ARAB 170 or ARAB 180 (or the equivalent)
Co-requisite: ARAB 202, ARAB 301, ARAB 302, or ARAB 401
This course is intended for students who have already studied one term of Jordanian dialect and have studied Modern Standard Arabic for several terms.  Students with a strong background in Modern Standard Arabic develop the capacity to understand main ideas and details in continuous speech on various topics in colloquial Arabic. While full understanding is still limited, by the end of the course students are able to ask questions and understand the responses, express facts and opinions in complex sentences, and engage in conversations in colloquial Arabic with native speakers on a wide range of topics. This course enables the student to meet daily and situational needs and requirements of a study and work routine. Students learn to handle complex conversations with confidence and social attitudes in simple non-academic language. This course builds on vocabulary and concepts studied in previous Modern Standard and colloquial Arabic courses and allows for more advanced practice using colloquial dialect.
Summer Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IIB Jordan Arabic Summer IA ARAB 270
ARAB 240: Summer Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IIB (Arabic 240; 1 credit)
Pre-requisite: ARAB 140 (or the equivalent)
Co-requisite: ARAB 202, ARAB 301, ARAB 302, or ARAB 401
This course is intended for students who have already studied one term of Moroccan dialect and have studied Modern Standard Arabic for several terms.  Students with a strong background in Modern Standard Arabic develop the capacity to understand main ideas and details in continuous speech on various topics in colloquial Arabic. While full understanding is still limited, by the end of the course students are able to ask questions and understand the responses, express facts and opinions in complex sentences, and engage in conversations in colloquial Arabic with native speakers on a wide range of topics. This course enables the student to meet daily and situational needs and requirements of a study and work routine. Students learn to handle complex conversations with confidence and social attitudes in simple non-academic language. This course builds on vocabulary and concepts studied in previous Modern Standard and colloquial Arabic courses and allows for more advanced practice using colloquial dialect.
Summer Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IIB Morocco Arabic Summer IA ARAB 240
ARAB 210: Summer Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IIA (Arabic 210; 1 credit)
Pre-requisite: ARAB 110 (or the equivalent)
Co-requisite: ARAB 102 or ARAB 201
This course is intended for students who have already studied one term of Moroccan dialect and have limited experience with Modern Standard Arabic. This course aims to strengthen all-around proficiency and speaking skills in a wide range of daily situations and common tasks. The course prepares students to understand conversations about personal life and the surrounding environment. In addition, this course exposes the student to real-time speaking.  Students learn to converse and describe all major time frames (past, present, and future), as well as to contribute to conversations on a variety of familiar topics, with a high degree of accuracy, clarity and precision in the local dialect. Some example topics that are typically covered in this course include directions and places, placing orders at a café or restaurant, shopping and travel. This course builds on vocabulary and concepts studied in previous Modern Standard and colloquial Arabic courses and allows for more advanced practice using colloquial dialect.
Summer Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IIA Morocco Arabic Summer IA ARAB 210
ARAB 180: Summer Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IC (Arabic 180; 1 credit)
Co-requisite: ARAB 301, ARAB 302, or ARAB 401
This course is intended for students who have no previous experience with Jordanian dialect and possess a high-intermediate to advanced proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. Students who have studied Modern Standard Arabic for several terms are introduced to a wide variety of vocabulary, expressions, and grammar structures used frequently in the local environment. This course aims to help students reach a level where they are able to successfully navigate a number of more complicated communicative tasks in colloquial Arabic in social situations. Conversation in this course focuses on real life exchanges with host country nationals on topics key to communicating in the target language and culture. By the end of the course, students are able to ask questions and understand the responses, express facts and opinions in simple sentences, and engage in conversations in colloquial Arabic with native speakers. This course builds on vocabulary and concepts studied in previous Arabic courses, which allows for quicker progression with the colloquial dialect.
Summer Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IC Jordan Arabic Summer IA ARAB 180
ARAB 170: Summer Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IB (Arabic 170; 1 credit)
Co-requisite: ARAB 201 or ARAB 202
This course is intended for students who have no previous experience with Jordanian dialect and possess an intermediate proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic.  Students are introduced to a range of vocabulary, expressions, and grammar structures used frequently in the local environment. This course aims to help students reach a level where they are able to navigate a number of communicative tasks in colloquial Arabic in straightforward social situations. Conversation in this course focuses on real-life exchanges with host country nationals on common topics that are key to functioning in the target language and culture. By the end of the course, students are able to ask questions and understand the responses, express facts and opinions in simple sentences, and engage in conversations in colloquial Arabic with native speakers. This course builds on vocabulary and concepts studied in previous Arabic courses which allows for quicker progression with the colloquial dialect.
Summer Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IB Jordan Arabic Summer IA ARAB 170
ANTH 301: Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East (Anthropology 301, 3 credits)
This interdisciplinary course presents a general introduction to the contemporary Middle East, a region that has come to carry diverse meanings to Westerners.  It will highlight the multiple and the complex cultural and socio-political life in the Contemporary Middle East, challenging some of the assumptions and stereotypes about the history, cultures, religions and politics associated with this particular region.  It will introduce the various Middle Eastern groups as they vary in language, religion, subsistence economy and other cultural variables.  The genealogical relationships between dialects, sects, and modes of subsistence will be outlined and framed within a historical context in order to highlight the dynamic nature of Middle Eastern diversity and how impressions of "stagnant East" are often misleading.  Furthermore, the biological diversity of the Middle Easterners will be examined in relation to the legacy of "scientific racism," nationalist claims and the findings of modern population genetics.  
Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East Jordan Anthropology Semester A&A ANTH 301
Arab 316: Media Arabic III (Arabic 316; 3 credits; Prerequisite: Mastery of the material covered in AMIDEAST’s Arabic 315 or the equivalent; Co-requisite Arabic 202 or higher)

This is an advanced course for students who have taken at least two media Arabic courses previously. This course exposes students to the Arabic used in opinion pieces and on electronic media (radio, television, documentaries, etc.) and focuses on mastering vocabulary commonly used in Arab print and electronic media, ability to read and understand Arabic newspapers without using a dictionary, ability to listen to radio and television news broadcasts, writing summaries of news articles and broadcasts, and discussing current economic, political and social issues covered in the Arabic media. All of the material used is authentic, with an emphasis on the local opinion pieces and advanced news from local media. Only offered periodically.

Media Arabic III Jordan Arabic Semester A&A ARAB 316
ARAB 140: Summer Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IB (Arabic 140; 1 credit)
Co-requisite: ARAB 201, ARAB 202, ARAB 301, ARAB 302, or ARAB 401
This course is intended for students who have no previous experience with Moroccan dialect and possess an intermediate to advanced proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic.  Students are introduced to a range of vocabulary, expressions, and grammar structures used frequently in the local environment. This course aims to help students reach a level where they are able to navigate a number of communicative tasks in colloquial Arabic in straightforward social situations. Conversation in this course focuses on real life exchanges with host country nationals on common topics key to functioning in the target language and culture. Some example topics that are typically covered in this course include introducing oneself in-depth, food and drinks, habits, hobbies, directions and places. Grammar will also be taught in this course as it relates to these topics. By the end of the course, students are able to ask questions and understand the responses, express facts and opinions in simple sentences, and engage in conversations in colloquial Arabic with native speakers. This course builds on vocabulary and concepts studied in previous Arabic courses which allows for quicker progression with the colloquial dialect.
Summer Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IB Morocco Arabic Summer IA ARAB 140
ARAB 110: Summer Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IA (Arabic 110; 1 credit)
Co-requisite: ARAB 101 or ARAB 102
This course is intended for students who have no previous experience with Moroccan dialect and possess a beginning proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic.  Students are introduced to basic vocabulary, expressions, and grammar structures used frequently in the local environment. This course aims to help students reach a level where they are able to navigate a limited number of uncomplicated communicative tasks in colloquial Arabic in straightforward social situations. Conversation in this course focuses on real life exchanges with host country nationals on common topics that are key to basic functioning in the target language and culture. Some example topics that are typically covered in this course include making acquaintances, discussing family and relatives, numbers, weather and daily activities. Grammar will also be taught in this course as it relates to these topics. By the end of the course, students are able to ask essential questions and understand the responses, express basic facts and opinions in simple sentences, and engage in simple conversations in colloquial Arabic with native speakers.
Summer Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IA Morocco Arabic Summer IA ARAB 110
ARAB 218: Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IIA (Arabic 218; 3 credits)
Pre-requisite: ARAB 117, 118
In this course, the student should gain the ability to understand slightly more complex sentences in colloquial Arabic. The course prepares students to understand conversations about personal life and the surrounding environment. In addition, this course exposes the student to real-time speaking, typical phone call conversations, and some simple advertisements. This course exposes students to social attitudes and positions. The student can take the initiative to start and end conversions and narrate simple events. The student also becomes more aware of culture and more aware of the courtesies that should be used in colloquial Arabic. Some example topics that are typically covered in this course include describing people, selecting clothes, illness, and social events. Grammar will also be taught in this course as it relates to the above mentioned topics.
Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IIA Morocco Arabic Semester A&A and RSF ARAB 218
ARAB 216: Media Arabic IA (Arabic 216; 3 credits; Prerequisite: Mastery of the material covered in AMIDEAST's Arabic 202 or higher; Co-requisite Arabic 301 or higher)
This accelerated course introduces students to the Arabic used in the media. The course is designed to assist students to read simple news items in different newspapers from Arab countries; listen to and understand broadcast news; and understand the role of media in shaping Arab thought. This course utilizes the book Media Arabic: A Coursebook for Reading Arabic News (Revised Edition, 2014) by Alaa Elgibali and Nevenka Korica in addition to authentic materials, with an emphasis on the local media. Typically offered in both fall and spring terms depending on student interest.
Media Arabic IA Jordan & Morocco Arabic Semester A&A ARAB 216
ARAB 215: Media Arabic I (Arabic 215; 3 credits; Prerequisite: Mastery of the material covered in AMIDEAST’s Arabic 102; Co-requisite: Arabic 201 or Arabic 202)
The course introduces students to the Arabic used in the media. The course is designed to assist students to read simple news items in different newspapers from Arab countries; listen to and understand broadcast news; and understand the role of media in shaping Arab thought. This course utilizes the book Media Arabic: A Coursebook for Reading Arabic News (Revised Edition, 2014) by Alaa Elgibali and Nevenka Korica in addition to authentic materials, with an emphasis on the local media. Typically offered in both fall and spring terms depending on student interest.
Media Arabic I Jordan & Morocco Arabic Semester A&A ARAB 215
ARAB 138: Colloquial Jordanian Arabic ID (Arabic 138; 3 credits)
Co-requisite: ARAB 301, ARAB 302, or ARAB 401
This course is intended for students who have no previous experience with Jordanian dialect and possess a high-intermediate to advanced proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. Students who have studied Modern Standard Arabic for several terms are introduced to a wide variety of vocabulary, expressions, and grammar structures used frequently in the local environment. This course aims to help students reach a level where they are able to successfully navigate a number of more complicated communicative tasks in colloquial Arabic in social situations. Conversation in this course focuses on real life exchanges with host country nationals on topics key to communicating in the target language and culture. By the end of the course, students are able to ask questions and understand the responses, express facts and opinions in simple sentences, and engage in conversations in colloquial Arabic with native speakers. This course builds on vocabulary and concepts studied in previous Arabic courses, which allows for quicker progression with the colloquial dialect.
Colloquial Jordanian Arabic ID Jordan Arabic Semester A&A ARAB 138
ARAB 137: Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IC (Arabic 137; 3 credits)
Co-requisite: ARAB 201 or ARAB 202
This course is intended for students who have no previous experience with Jordanian dialect and possess an intermediate proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic.  Students are introduced to a range of vocabulary, expressions, and grammar structures used frequently in the local environment. This course aims to help students reach a level where they are able to navigate a number of communicative tasks in colloquial Arabic in straightforward social situations. Conversation in this course focuses on real-life exchanges with host country nationals on common topics that are key to functioning in the target language and culture. By the end of the course, students are able to ask questions and understand the responses, express facts and opinions in simple sentences, and engage in conversations in colloquial Arabic with native speakers. This course builds on vocabulary and concepts studied in previous Arabic courses which allows for quicker progression with the colloquial dialect.
Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IC Jordan Arabic Semester A&A ARAB 137
ARAB 136: Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IB (Arabic 136; 3 credits)
Co-requisite: ARAB 102
This course is intended for students who have no previous experience with Jordanian dialect and possess a beginning proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic.  Students are introduced to basic vocabulary, expressions, and grammar structures used frequently in the local environment. This course aims to help students reach a level where they are able to navigate a limited number of uncomplicated communicative tasks in colloquial Arabic in straightforward social situations. Conversation in this course focuses on real life exchanges with host country nationals on common topics key to basic functioning in the target language and culture. By the end of the course, students are able to ask essential questions and understand the responses, express basic facts and opinions in simple sentences, and engage in simple conversations in colloquial Arabic with native speakers.
Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IB Jordan Arabic Semester A&A ARAB 136
ARAB 135: Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IA (Arabic 135; 3 credits)
Co-requisite: ARAB 101
This course is intended for students who have no previous experience with Jordanian dialect and are studying Modern Standard Arabic for the first time.  Students are introduced to basic vocabulary, expressions, and grammar structures used frequently in the local environment. This course aims to help students reach a level where they are able to navigate a limited number of uncomplicated communicative tasks in colloquial Arabic in straightforward social situations. Conversation in this course focuses on real life exchanges with host country nationals on common topics key to basic functioning in the target language and culture. By the end of the course, students are able to ask essential questions and understand the responses, express basic facts and opinions in simple sentences, and engage in simple conversations in colloquial Arabic with native speakers.
Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IA Jordan Arabic Semester A&A ARAB 135
ARAB 119: Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IC (Arabic 119; 3 credits)
Co-requisite: ARAB 301, 302, 401
This course aims to enable the student to understand colloquial Arabic sentences composed of elements that have been studied in previous Arabic courses. The courses focuses on communication which relates to personal life, basic needs, social norms and as well as complex functions; such as seeking housing and using transportation. At this level, the student can participate in a limited number of colloquial Arabic dialogues and debates and can ask and answer questions. Some example topics that are typically covered in this course include introducing oneself in-depth, food, habits, transportation, and the home. Grammar will also be taught in this course as it relates to the above mentioned topics.
Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IC Morocco Arabic Semester A&A and RSF ARAB 119
ARAB 118: Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IB (Arabic 118; 3 credits)
Co-requisite: ARAB 102, 201, 202
This course aids the student in understanding simple colloquial Arabic questions and covers clear pronunciation of topics related to everyday life. By the end of the course the student can also understand the often repeated expressions used in colloquial Arabic. At this level students are exposed to a number of colloquial Arabic vocabulary words related to daily life that can be utilized for daily needs, enabling the student to use simple courtesies and phrases in their natural contexts. Some example topics that are typically covered in the course include family, home, utensils, colors, hobbies, and jobs. Grammar will also be taught in this course as it relates to the above mentioned topics.
Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IB Morocco Arabic Semester A&A and RSF ARAB 118
ARAB 117: Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IA (Arabic 117; 3 credits)
Co-requisite: ARAB 101
This course aids the student in understanding a limited set of introductory colloquial Arabic words as well as short phrases taught in the classroom. By the end of the course the student is able to understand some colloquial Arabic words, passages, simple questions, and commands through repetition of common topics related to the surrounding environment. Students in this course learn new vocabulary related to daily life. By the end of this course the student is able to speak using very short phrases related to everyday needs. Some example topics that are typically covered in the course include acquaintances, transportation, numbers, days and weather, eating and drinking. Grammar will also be taught in this course as it relates to the above mentioned topics.
Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IA Morocco Arabic Semester A&A and RSF ARAB 117
ARAB 112: Moroccan Arabic and Culture (Arabic 112, 3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to Moroccan Arabic and Culture through classroom instruction in Moroccan Arabic (35 hours) and extended lectures/discussions (five lectures for a total of ten hours) on various aspects of Moroccan culture. Students are introduced to common words, expressions, and structures used frequently in everyday speech by Moroccans. They practice them in class before they are given assignments to carry out with native speakers in real situations. Students also attend lectures focused around many facets of Moroccan culture and have time to discuss these aspects both with each other and with faculty.
Moroccan Arabic and Culture Morocco Arabic Short-Term MAC ARAB 112
ANTH 370: Social Change in Contemporary Jordan (Anthropology 370, 3 credits)
This course focuses on the socio-cultural impact of recent political and social events in the Middle East on contemporary Jordanian society.  The course highlights the complexities of cultural, ethnic, and socio-political change in contemporary Jordan and the impact of external factors on the changes taking place.  In addition, many of the assumptions and stereotypes about Jordan’s history, cultures, religions, and politics are examined and challenged.  Topics covered in this course include the various waves of migration into Jordan (Palestinians, Iraqis and Syrians) and how the presence of immigrants transformed and continues to transform the socio-cultural and political structures of Jordanian society, the impact of the Arab spring on Jordan as a socio-political entity, and the role of the Jordanian youth in reshaping the country’s political and national identity. In addition, the new Islamic groups, with special emphasis on groups such as Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS), will be examined to discuss their role in and impact on the various segments of Jordanian society. Furthermore, the role of women and the women’s movement in Jordan will be discussed in relation to regional and global women’s movements.
Social Change in Contemporary Jordan Jordan Anthropology Semester A&A ANTH 370