Colloquial Arabic

Depending on the program, students have the opportunity to take colloquial Arabic (1-3 credits). AMIDEAST offers colloquial Arabic from beginning to advanced proficiencies. Included below are a few notes about the value of colloquial Arabic, a list of different colloquial courses offered by AMIDEAST, and descriptions of different Arabic dialects. To view course descriptions for any of the Arabic courses listed below, please visit this page: AMIDEAST Course Catalog.

 

Why Study Colloquial Arabic? 

  • Arabic is a diglossic language that varies between its written and spoken (colloquial/dialect) forms. 
  • Most students who study Arabic look forward to using it in order to communicate with native speakers and learn about the societies of Arabic-speaking peoples through linguistic and cultural immersion. Learning a local dialect is an important step in achieving this goal. 
  • While not all native Arabic speakers will understand every Arabic dialect, learning any dialect is beneficial to a student’s language skills.  This is because students will begin to understand how to learn a dialect and the types of variances that exist between Modern Standard Arabic and colloquial language. The ability to adapt to other Arabic dialects becomes easier as students become familiar with this process. 
  • Studying abroad in an Arabic-speaking country is by far and away the best opportunity for a student to familiarize her or himself with a dialect and to begin using her or his knowledge of Modern Standard Arabic to connect with native speakers.  While studying abroad, students are able to immediately apply the lessons learned in their colloquial Arabic course to their everyday lives. 
  • Likewise, students can bring questions that arise during interactions with native speakers to their colloquial Arabic class to discuss and learn about the language that they encounter.  This allows for a learning environment in which students are challenged to draw from previous knowledge, adapt that knowledge to a different context, and reinforce new knowledge by engaging with native speakers.
  • At AMIDEAST, we believe colloquial Arabic to serve an important role in helping students develop a deeper understanding of the local culture, which is why all programs include a colloquial Arabic element. 

 

Guide to Arabic Dialects

Many students ask us which dialect is “best” to learn while studying abroad. Each dialect of the Arabic language is unique, drawing from Modern Standard Arabic and regional culture influences. To work, live, or even briefly re-visit the Arab world, it is necessary to be familiar with one or more Arabic dialects to succeed.

JORDANIAN COLLOQUIAL ARABICالعامية الأردنية Shu hadda? (What’s this?) Amman is an ancient city facing the modern challenges of rapid development and population growth. Jordanian Arabic (Ammiya) is linguistically similar to FusHa (Modern Standard Arabic), making it understandable throughout the Arab world. Learning Jordanian Arabic is useful for students interested in peace and conflict resolution, refugee issues, and international development.

MOROCCAN COLLOQUIAL ARABIC.  الدارجة المغربية Shnu hadi? (What’s this?)  Morocco is a wonderful place for Arabic language learners to develop their skills. Rooted in Modern Standard Arabic, Moroccan Arabic (Darija)contains many of the same verb roots and vocabulary heard throughout the Arab world, with some French, Spanish and Amazigh influences. For those interested in migration, archeology, women’s studies, and economic development this is a dialect worth investing in.

TUNISIAN COLLOQUIAL ARABIC. الدارجة التونسية Shnoua hadha? (What’s this?) Tunisia is a blend of Arab, African, and European civilization and is situated on the southern shore of the Mediterranean Sea. Tunisian Arabic (Tunsi) has many verb roots, grammatical structures and words in common with FusHa (Modern Standard Arabic); the dialect also includes some French, Italian, and Amazigh (Berber) linguistic influences. For those interested in democratization, politics, and urban development, Tunisian Arabic is worth learning.

 

Colloquial Arabic Courses with AMIDEAST


Jordanian Colloquial Arabic Courses – Semester

Colloquial Jordanian Arabic (3 credits) instruction begins during on-site orientation and continues throughout the semester. Colloquial Arabic is offered at a variety of levels. Students are placed in classes appropriate to their previous knowledge of Arabic. The following levels of colloquial Arabic are offered during the semester:

 1st Semester      2nd Semester   3rd Semester

  • Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IA (Arabic 135; 3 credits; co-requisite: ARAB 101)
  • Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IB (Arabic 136; 3 credits; co-requisite: ARAB 102)
  • Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IC (Arabic 137; 3 credits; co-requisites: ARAB 201, 202)
  • Colloquial Jordanian Arabic ID (Arabic 138; 3 credits; co-requisites: ARAB 301, 302, 401)
  • Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IIA (Arabic 235; 3 credits; co-requisites: ARAB 102, 201)
  • Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IIB (Arabic 236; 3 credits; co-requisite: ARAB 202, 301)
  • Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IIC (Arabic 237; 3 credits; co-requisites: ARAB 302, 401)
  • Colloquial Jordanian Arabic III (Arabic 335; 3 credits; co-requisites: ARAB 201, 202, 301, 302, 401)
Jordanian Colloquial Arabic Courses – Summer

Summer students receive 20 hours of instruction per session in Jordanian Arabic (1 credit per term). The following levels of colloquial Arabic are offered during the summer:

Colloquial Jordanian Arabic

  • Summer Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IA (Arabic 130; 1 credit; co-requisites: ARAB 101, 102)
  • Summer Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IB (Arabic 170; 1 credit; co-requisites: ARAB 201, 202)
  • Summer Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IC (Arabic 180; 1 credit; co-requisites: ARAB 301, 302, 401)
  • Summer Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IIA (Arabic 230; 1 credit; co-requisites: ARAB 102, 201)
  • Summer Colloquial Jordanian Arabic IIB (Arabic 270; 1 credit; co-requisites: ARAB 202, 301, 302, 401)
  • Summer Colloquial Jordanian Arabic III (Arabic 330; 1 credit; co-requisites: ARAB 201, 202, 301, 302, 401)

Colloquial Arabic Progression Table:

Moroccan Colloquial Arabic Courses – Semester

Colloquial Moroccan Arabic

Colloquial Moroccan Arabic (3 credits) instruction begins during on-site orientation and continues throughout the semester. Colloquial Arabic is offered at a variety of levels. Students are placed in classes appropriate to their previous knowledge of Arabic. The following levels of colloquial Arabic are offered during the semester:

    1st Semester             2nd Semester        3rd Semester

  • Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IA (Arabic 117; 3 credits; co-requisite: ARAB 101)
  • Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IB (Arabic 118; 3 credits; co-requisites: ARAB 102, 201, 202)
  • Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IC (Arabic 119; 3 credits; co-requisites: ARAB 301, 302, 401)
  • Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IIA (Arabic 218; 3 credits; co-requisites: ARAB 102, 201, 202, 301)
  • Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IIB (Arabic 219; 3 credits; co-requisites: ARAB 302, 401)
  • Colloquial Moroccan Arabic III (Arabic 319; 3 credits; co-requisites: ARAB 201, 202, 301, 302, 401)
Moroccan Colloquial Arabic Courses – Summer

Summer students receive 20 hours of instruction per session in Moroccan Arabic (1 credit per term). The following levels of colloquial Arabic are offered during the summer:

Summer Colloquial Moroccan Arabic

  • Summer Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IA (Arabic 110; 1 credit; co-requisites: ARAB 101, 102)
  • Summer Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IB (Arabic 140; 1 credit; co-requisites: ARAB 201, 202, 301, 302, 401)
  • Summer Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IIA (Arabic 210; 1 credit; co-requisites: ARAB 102, 201)
  • Summer Colloquial Moroccan Arabic IIB (Arabic 240; 1 credit; co-requisites: ARAB 202, 301, 302, 401)
  • Summer Colloquial Moroccan Arabic III (Arabic 310; 1 credit; co-requisites: ARAB 201, 202, 301, 302, 401)

Colloquial Arabic Progression Table: